Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel

Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel

This cedar chest is my favorite project so far! I bought this chest and the matching bed at an auction.  I didn’t have a plan for them, but the chest had nice detail and went pretty cheap.  I couldn’t resist and we found a way to wedge everything I had purchased into the back of our van.

 

Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel
Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel

This chest wasn’t in bad shape at all and could have been sanded down and restained, but it just wasn’t my style.  I wanted the carved details on the lid and around the base to be the focal point.

 

Kleen strip deglosser

I started this remodel by lightly sanding with 220 grit sandpaper.  I filled a few gouges with wood putty and then gave everything another light sanding.  After I removed all dust I used Klean-Strip liquid deglosser just as an extra precaution.  Painters tape was placed on the inside lip of the chest to ensure no overspray made it’s way between the thin gaps.

 

 

minwax Paste FInishing Wax

I will admit that I have been skipping the separate primer step lately.  Instead, I’ve been paying a little more attention to my sanding preparation and using Olympic’s One paint + primer.  I adore this paint line and it’s so much easier to do a little extra sanding rather than cleaning my sprayer out an extra time!  Once the paint was dry I lightly sanded everything super smooth and distressed the details.  When I was happy with the results I gave the entire chest two coats of Minwax finishing paste wax for protection and shine.  I have had great success with this wax.  It takes a few weeks to full cure, but after that it is very durable.  I waxed our kitchen table four years ago after painting it and have zero scapes.  We eat, homeschool and play dominoes on this table constantly.  I occasionally take a magic eraser to the top when my daughter gets pencil marks all over it but it cleans up nicely and has never needed rewaxing.

 

 

Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel
When buffed, the paste wax gives the paint a buttery smooth finish that makes me super happy.  Just be sure to be gentle with the piece for a few weeks to let the paint and wax cure.  My entire family enjoys sitting on this bench to look out the window now that we moved it to another wall in our dining room under a large window.  Even with all that abuse we haven’t caused a single scrape.
Tiffany Blue Waterfall Chest Remodel

 

Shabby Chic Coffee Table

Shabby Chic Coffee Table

 

I found this little table at a flea market and it looked terrible.  The original varnish was chipping and flaking off everywhere.  I usually don’t do a lot of sanding before I paint a piece of furniture, but I had to remove the lose varnish.

Shabby Chic Coffee Table
 Look at all those little chips.
Shabby Chic Coffee Table
I just gave the table a light sanding.
Shabby Chic Coffee Table
I went a different route with this table and started by applying a coat of white Kilz.  I plan on using several colors in different areas and later sanding to reveal the peek a boo colors below.
When distressing furniture with several colors underneath the piece always looks terrible until you put on the final coat.  Don’t lose heart and abandon the project!  I applied a layer of yellow over the green in some areas, but forgot to take a picture while at it’s worst!
Shabby Chic Coffee Table
I lightly sanded the table to give the final white coat a smooth surface.  I used my trusty sprayer and gave the table a smooth coat of ultra white paint.  I sanded this little thing like crazy to show all those pretty layers of paint.  When it was exactly how I wanted it I brushed all the dust away and gave the entire table a good coat of clear poly to give it a nice shine.
Shabby Chic Coffee Table
I used my Cricut to cut the “Love” out of removable vinyl and made this project complete!!
Shabby Chic Coffee Table

~Anne

Valentine’s Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth Tutorial

I adore Valentine’s Day decorations.  When we owned our little flower shop, it was so exciting to see the shop filled with beautiful flowers, cuddly stuffed animals and fun balloons.  It was the craziest time of the year for our family, but overall we made amazing memories in that little shop during that time.  My husband would take several days off of work to help me prepare and our mothers would take turns caring for our girls.  My sister came to run the phone and front counter while I arranged flowers until I couldn’t feel my fingers.  On Valentine’s Day any of our friends and family who were available poured into the shop to help in any way possible and that little shop became one big party…..with me still panicking and arranging flowers like a maniac.  I loved hearing everyone laugh and it was amazing to look around the room and see all the love those people had for us.

As Valentine’s Day approaches I try to add at least one festive item to our entryway.  This year I wanted to make something with things I already had at the house.  I looked through my craft stash and found an extra wire wreath frame that I purchased when the girls and I made cedar wreaths at Christmas time.  While digging I also saw a large chunk of dropcloth that was leftover from a chair I reupholstered last year.  So, I decided to use these items to make a wreath and would wing it as far as decorations.

 

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

What is needed:

  • Wire floral frame (I used a 12 inch frame)
  • Canvas drop cloth (I purchased mine at Lowes)
  • Scissors
  • Several pieces of floral wire
  • Floral tape
  • Wirecutters
  • Decorations

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First, you need to unfold your drop cloth and make a slit through the top seam like I did above.  Then you will just grab either side of the slit and pull in opposite directions.  The dropcloth will tear all the way down in a perfect line.  No tedious cutting and the pieces will be perfectly frayed!  I cut my slits at 5-6 inch intervals and just ripped the fabric.

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

My wreath took six strips of drop cloth that were five inches wide and six-foot long.

 

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Wrap several pieces of wire with floral tape.  This can be an annoying product to work with, but it really helps the wire stay nice and tight.  I fold a small piece over the top of the wire end and then use my thumb and forefinger to grasp the fold tightly and spin that tip of the wire.  My other hand gently stretches and guides the tape down the wire to the other end.  Once the wires are wrapped use your wire cutters to divide each wire into three pieces.

 

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Fold a wire in half and place the end of a drop cloth strip across the “V”.

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Fold the cloth over so there is enough fabric for the waxy floral tape to grab.

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Then grab the two wires closely to the cloth and twist them tightly together.

 

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From the back of you wreath frame poke the two wires through an opening where the cross bars intersect.  This will keep your fabric from sliding around while you are working.

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Now you flip your frame over and poke you fabric through the outer ring and decide how fluffy you want your wreath.  Longer loops make a loose weave.

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Continue feeding your fabric through all three hoops.

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Once you have all three hoops filled and the length you want slide them at the same time towards the bar where you twisted your wire.

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You should have a fluffy bunch like above.  This is the point where you tweak the loop lengths with each row you weave from now on.

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At the end of each row twist the tail of fabric from behind and move back to the outer hoop and repeat the process.  Fluff and adjust as needed.

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When you reach the next intersecting bar the space gets really tight.  Just scrunch the loops as best as you can and fold and poke the fabric through as best as you can.

 

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I’m really pushing the other loops out of the way pretty hard to make room for the middle hoops loop.

 

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Once I finished this last inner loop, I only had a few inches of fabric behind the frame.  I just grabbed another wire and tied it to the nearest intersecting wires like when I started the project.

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Use your wirecutters to snip those tails once you have tightly twisted the wires several times.

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One of the six sections completed.

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

This took approximately 45 minutes to finish.

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

Take a few minutes and open the loops and fluff the wreath.

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

I added a pink grosgrain loop and bow to the top and attached an arrow that I first covered in beautiful German glass glitter.

Valentine's Day Wreath Made With A DropclothValentine's Day Wreath Made With A Dropcloth

~Anne

Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial

Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial
Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial

First, tear a page out of your book and decide how big you want your cones to be in the end.  If you want small cones just cut your paper in half or even quarters for tiny cones.  Then just take your cone like I have below and twist it into your desired shape and then glue or hot glue the edge.  It may take a few minutes to get the twisting down.

Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial
Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial

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Once you have your desired cone shape use a gluestick or hot glue to hold it together.

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Once your cones are made you can use any shape of thick cardboard as a backer for your wreath.  I cut a 3 inch circle out of poster board and put a dot in the center of the circle for my mini wreaths.  This is the time to hot glue a ribbon hanger between your backer and the cones to make everything seamless.  Now all you need to do is start hot gluing your cones on at 12 o’cock and 6 o’clock.  Then place cones at 3 and 9 o’clock to form a cross shape.  Once those four cones are in place just take your time and fill in the areas between being careful to not crowd the cones.  If adding another layer of cones in the center, just follow the same technique.  I often make smaller cones for the center area, but that is up to you.

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Using the same technique as above, you can make wreaths in any shape you can imagine!  I decided to use one of the hardback book covers that was leftover after tearing out off of the pages to make this fun rectangle wreath.  I also took a bit of colored scrapbooking paper and rolled strips into rose shapes to add a little color to my wreaths.

Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial
Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial
Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial
Shabby Chic Bookpage Wreath Tutorial

 

~Anne

How to Make Chalkpaint on the Cheap

How to Make Chalkpaint on the Cheap

How to Make Chalkpaint on the Cheap

       This table was beautiful oak, but in desperate need of refinishing. I decided to really make it pop by distressing the bottom and restoring the top giving it a high shine. I hope you like the finished project!

       This is what the table looked like when I started. It was nice, but the varnish was chipped and had water rings. I had to refinish it either way so I decided to paint the bottom in white chalk paint. I make my chalk paint by using a disposable container and pour a cup or two of paint into the jar. I then add a spoonful or two of plaster of paris to the paint and stir like crazy. I start with just a tiny amount of plaster and slowly add more until I get the consistency I want. I like my chalk paint thick because it takes less coats, but a thinner consistency works just as well.  I have used this method on several of my children’s furniture and it has held up beautifully.


       I normally only paint two coats with the chalk paint. It looks splotchy in the picture, but it’s going to be heavily distressed so I don’t worry too much about even coverage. 


       Once the paint is dry I sanded and sanded and sanded. I vow to NEVER use chalk paint on another piece with this much detail! It looks great now, but the thick chalk paint filled in a lot of the detail and I had to really sand the details to define them again. Chalk paint is better suited for larger detailed pieces….or furniture that you want to look rustic.


       One great thing about chalk paint is it dries hard in a fraction of the time of standard paint so you can finish projects quickly which is good for an impatient person like me!! After I distressed the bottom I used Minwax paste wax to protect and give the legs a soft shine.


       The final step was to sand and stain the beautiful oak table top. I applied several coats of Minwax Polyshades in pecan. I LOVE this stain!! I have tried other brands, but I feel this one gives a great shine and hard seal all in one step! I use wide sponge brushes and work the stain into the wood and then take the time to brush in the direction of the grain until I have removed as many bubbles as possible. I occasionally can get away with only sanding once between coats, but usually have to sand twice between applications. I lightly sand with 220 grit or steelwool depending on the imperfections I need to remove.


I just love the shine the top has compared to the soft wax finish on the legs. Now I need to find this sweetie a place in our home!!

~Anne

 

My 6 Favorite Products for Creating Beautiful Shabby Chic Furniture

 

My 6 Favorite Products for Creating Beautiful Shabby Chic Furniture

I have been painting furniture for several years and have used many products.  Some made the task harder, but several have become essential to me when I am starting a new project.  I am going to showcase my six favorites below.

 

1.
   When I start a furniture project I thoroughly inspect the item and make any structural repairs and wash any grimy areas.  Then I look for areas that need a little wood filler.  Peeling veneer and gouges can quickly be hidden with just a dab of wood filler.  The stainable Elmer’s wood filler is my go to because it dries quickly and is in an easy to use squeeze tube.  I buy stainable filler just in case I decide to stain a dresser top instead of painting it.  Then I don’t have to worry about using the wrong filler if I change my mind and decide to stain instead.

I usually use very little filler, because I primarily distress the furniture I paint.  However, I often need to fill holes from drawer handles I am changing out or to hide some outright abuse by previous owners.

2.

    Once the filler has dried I use 3M sandpaper to smooth out the treated areas.  I buy the multipack which contains a few sheets of each grit of sandpaper.  The rougher grit is used to start distress areas on the face of the furniture after the paint has dried and the finer grit paper is for smoothing the entire piece making it buttery smooth.  I occasionally use a oscillating hand sander, but the distressing and smoothing is a quick job that can get away from you if you try distressing with a sander.  Who wants those little circle marks?

 

3.    

  

After the wood filler has been applied and sanded smooth a quick wipe down with Klean-Strip easy liquid sander deglosser.  This stuff is amazing, but has a strong smell and irritates my skin.  Wear latex gloves and use in a well ventilated area when applying this product.  Don’t let my warning deter you from using this product.  It does a great job of cleaning/etching the finish of your piece.  This allows you to save TONS of time while prepping furniture for painting.  NOTE:  My bottle is several years old and has new labeling as shown at the bottom of this post.

 

4.

Now we are ready to talk paint.  Olympic ONE is the only paint I will use.  This paint has primer in it and holds up to tons of abuse.   I also have my paint mixed in a flat finish.  This is my favorite trick!  Flat paint dries in minutes if using a sprayer to apply.   I am incredibly inpatient and like to begin and finish a project in just a few hours.

 

 

 

 

5.

     I have used many brushes and sprayers to apply paint to my projects.  However, none of them were without annoyance.  Years ago I came across a review of the Command Max all in one sprayer, which is now labeled as the Homeright finish max fine finish sprayer.  I was skeptical that a sprayer without a compressor could deliver a quality finish, but the reviews were very convincing.  At the time the spray cost under $80 so I decided to take a gamble.  Well, it was an excellent decision!  I have been using this gem for years and it has many hours of use under its belt without any problems.  I thin the paint a tiny bit and get to work.  It sounds like an overgrown hair dryer, but no louder than any other sprayer I’ve used in the past.  This sprayer sips paint and sprays thin even coats which allows the flat paint to dry quickly.

6.

Minwax finishing paste wax is incredibly durable and gives painted furniture a buttery smooth finish.  I save all of our old socks for this task.  The wax is liberally rubbed over the entire piece and then you use clean rags to remove excess wax and buff to a soft shine.  One coat is enough for low traffic areas, but two coats is recommended in areas that will receive wear.  I used two coats on our dining room table four years ago and have never had to reapply anything to protect its paint.  That table has endured daily meals, homework and a lot of games.

My 6 Favorite Products for Creating Beautiful Shabby Chic Furniture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save your time and money by using a few of my favorite products!

 

~ Anne

M. Anne Osterdyk is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

 

Shabby Chic Blue Table

Shabby Chic Blue Table

 

Shabby Chic Blue Table

 

 

I bought this adorable table on a whim two weeks ago at an auction. We arrived at the auction shortly before it ended and didn’t really have a chance to look around and inspect all the goodies. I spotted this table under a pile of junk and just hoped it was as sturdy as it looked. My husband had already headed to the van for a few minutes and I decided I wasn’t leaving empty-handed so I bid until this cutie was mine. I was really excited when I found out it came with two leaves making it a nice sized table. After everyone cleared to another area, I walked up to the table and gave it a little wiggle and my heart sank because it wobbled a lot more without the heavy items on top! I reluctantly walked to the van to get the muscle to help me carry the table. It was when he turned the table over to slide it into the van I noticed that each leg bolted onto the apron! I have a few other tables like this and they are amazing for easy storage and being able to tighten up any wobbles!! Yeah!!!

 

I picked up at least 15 different swatches of teal trying to find the shade I wanted and finally found the closest match to Tiffany & Co. blue!!

 

 

 

 

 

I sanded the table top with my hand sander and then I used Klean-Strip easy liquid sander deglosser to make sure the paint would adhere well.  On areas that will not endure a ton of abuse the deglosser will save you a lot of time.  I make sure the area is free of grime and just wipe this on and I’m ready to paint.  However, you NEED to wear gloves while applying the deglosser and as always work in a well ventilated area.

 

 

 

I sprayed the table with two coats of paint/primer and then sanded everything with 220 grit sandpaper. I lightly distressed the table and the gave it two coats of Minwax paste wax for protection.

 

 

 

 

Shabby Chic Blue Table

UPDATE!  We have used this table daily for over 4 years and it has held up beautifully.  The Minwax  paste finishing wax I used on the table has endured countless meals, games and plenty of homework.  I have not had to reapply anything to protect the table and it looks exactly the same today as the day I took these pictures.

                                               

Shabby Chic Blue Table

   ~ANNE

 

 

M. Anne Osterdyk is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

 

German Glass Glitter DIY

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Using German glass glitter is an addictive activity.  It’s hard to not want to bling out everything in the house, but if that’s how you roll go crazy!  My favorite way to use this amazing glitter is to decorate premade paper mache ornaments which adds a vintage touch to our Christmas tree.  I also like to take precut paper letters and glitz them up and turn them into fun party banners.

In this DIY, I am going to show you how easy German glass glitter is to use compared to the foil glitter we all grew up using.  You know the stuff.  It’s the metallic devil crafting item you hide in the back corner of your craft cabinet.  Hopefully, your sweet kiddos will forget it even exists, but they know exactly where it is at all times.  Once that lid is popped you will be sporting glitter makeup for days.  Fear no longer!  German glass glitter does not static cling to everything.  However, this stuff is the real deal and is made from thin silver coated glass that is ground super fine.  So, it’s not intended for those sweet kiddos to handle.

 

What you need:

German glass glitter (HERE)

Large storage container

Small storage container

Spoon

Craft brush

Paper mache letter (or anything….scrapbook, ornaments, spoons, toothbrush..)

Mod Podge

Waxed paper

Wipes

Mod Podge is my go to glue.  It dries crystal clear and adds a nice protective layer to my projects.  It’s water based and clean up is simple.  I like to use a small airtight storage container to pour the Mod Podge in and dip my craft brush into it for my projects instead of using straight out of the original bottle.  I use the large storage container to store my German glass glitter and a plastic spoon for dipping the glitter for sprinkling.

 

I buy these precut waxed paper sheets to put under my glitter container to catch any stray flecks.  I don’t want to waste any glitter!!

These 3 inch paper letters are perfect for custom banners for any occasion.

I start by only applying the Mod Podge in an 1 – 1 1/2 inch section of my letter being diligent to get the glue on the edges of the letter.

I then scoop the glitter and make sure to cover the inside and outside edges along with the face of the letter.

 

Isn’t that pretty!  That is just one layer and it is perfectly covered.  I rarely need to add any additional layers which is why this glitter goes so far!

Isn’t the final product sweet?!  I use a hole punch and twine to string these glittery letters into banners for Christmas decorations on my tree.  Merry Christmas draped across the fireplace in shimmery silver would be stunning.

Once I am finished beautifying my letter, I let it dry and then it’s time to clean up.  I simply pick up the already creased piece of waxed paper and pour the spilled glitter back into the storage container.  So simple.

I made a bit of a mess while taking pictures so I grabbed a baby wipe and swiped the table.  The glitter wasn’t static clung to every crack or stuck to my face like the other stuff.  Instead, I was left with a workspace that wouldn’t be coughing up bits of plastic glitter for months to come.

German glass glitter adds a beautiful accent to almost anything and I adore using it for party and Christmas decor!

 

~ANNE

M. Anne Osterdyk is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

 

Big Girl Glitter ~ German Glass Glitter

Have you ever heard of German Glass glitter?  I hadn’t until a few years ago and I have no idea why this wasn’t in my life years ago!  Seriously, how can a form of glitter this perfect not be in every crafters stash?!?!  I think those who had discovered its glittery goodness decided to keep it a closely guarded secret.

Well, I am here to try and raise awareness of my favorite product in the whole world.  Honestly, I often just go into my craft room and open the containers I keep my German glass glitter in and just stare at the sparkly goodness.  I get the same feeling as when I admire my wedding ring after it’s been cleaned.  The glitter catches the light and it sparkles just like the diamonds in my ring and I just smile.

Authentic German glass glitter is imported from Europe and is made from thin glass that is coated in a thin layer of silver.  Make sure you buy the real deal without any clear glass filler.  The silver is real and will sloooowly tarnish over time to give your project a beautiful patina.  Do you remember those old ornaments on grandma’s tree?  Those often had German glass glitter accents and decorations.  This glitter is made from finely ground glass so take care while handling and keep out of reach of small children.  I have never had a problem with cuts, so don’t let that deter you!  

The glitter goes a really long way and just an ounce or two will go further than you ever dreamed.  The coverage is perfect and I personally use mod podge as the glue for my projects, but I know many people just use regular white school glue.

I hope I have convinced you to add authentic German glass glitter to your personal craft stash.  You will not be disappointed! I have a ton of ornaments for my tree packed up, but they even after three years they were just as sparkly as the new ornaments I made this past Christmas!  Below are a few of the projects I have used this glitter on.

 

 

 

~ Anne

I (M. Anne Osterdyk) am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

 

All Sugar and No Spice Shabbu Chic Waterfall Dresser Remodel

 

All Sugar and No Spice Shabbu Chic Waterfall Dresser Remodel

The finish on this waterfall dresser was very thin and had plenty of scrapes and chips in the veneer.  Overall, the dresser was in good sturdy condition, but it needed something to make those beautiful carved drawer pulls become the center of attention.  This dresser will hold bows, dresses and all kinds of sparkly things.  The little girl who will fill this dresser is all sugar and naturally needs a dresser to match her beauty.

I spent a few minutes gluing a few tiny pieces of veneer down and then I was ready to paint this beauty.  As soon as I began painting, I knew the sweet momma made the right decision on what shade of pink to use.  It’s vibrant, but not too sugary sweet.  After a light distressing and waxing, this project was finished and I think it’s my favorite remodel ever!

I am completely in love with this butter smooth pink dresser!  This beauty is heading to the bedroom of a sweet little girl who is just as sweet and beautiful as this dresser. 

Ugh, this dresser was so depressing before.

All Sugar and No Spice Shabbu Chic Waterfall Dresser Remodel

All Sugar and No Spice Shabbu Chic Waterfall Dresser Remodel

All Sugar and No Spice Shabbu Chic Waterfall Dresser Remodel

I was Featured!

~ Anne

I (M. Anne Osterdyk) am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.